{Leah Reviews} The Language of Thorns by Leigh Bardugo

Posted November 16, 2017 by Leah in Reviews / 2 Comments

{Leah Reviews} The Language of Thorns by Leigh BardugoThe Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic (Grisha Verse, #0.5, #2.5, #2.6) by Leigh Bardugo, Sara Kipin
Pages: 281
Published on September 26th 2017
by Imprint
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult
Format: Hardcover
Source: Purchased
Goodreads
Also by this author: Shadow and Bone, Siege and Storm, Ruin & Rising, Shadow and Bone, Siege and Storm

Love speaks in flowers. Truth requires thorns.

Travel to a world of dark bargains struck by moonlight, of haunted towns and hungry woods, of talking beasts and gingerbread golems, where a young mermaid's voice can summon deadly storms and where a river might do a lovestruck boy's bidding but only for a terrible price.

Inspired by myth, fairy tale, and folklore, #1 New York Times–bestselling author Leigh Bardugo has crafted a deliciously atmospheric collection of short stories filled with betrayals, revenge, sacrifice, and love.

Perfect for new readers and dedicated fans, these tales will transport you to lands both familiar and strange—to a fully realized world of dangerous magic that millions have visited through the novels of the Grishaverse.

This collection of six stories includes three brand-new tales, all of them lavishly illustrated with art that changes with each turn of the page, culminating in six stunning full-spread illustrations as rich in detail as the stories themselves.

5 Stars

Wow. I’ve been a Leigh Bardugo fan since the beginning, but The Language of Thorns truly cemented my love for her writing. Each piece is a gem of beautiful, glittering darkness, and you know how I love my dark stories. Some of these I’ve read before but it was still a treat to return to this world.

Most of the stories are fairy tale retellings but with major twists. “Ayama and the Thorn Wood” is a touching spin on “Beauty and the Beast,” only beauty and beast both bare their teeth. “The Soldier Prince” is a heartbreaking yet powerful take of “The Nutcracker,” where the nutcracker must learn to be his own person. My favorite was “When Water Sang Fire,” which is the tragic yet wickedly awesome origin of the sea witch from “The Little Mermaid.” Nothing is what it seems, secrets are revealed in heartbreaking ways, and everything should be questioned.

The world building in each tale is phenomenal– whether it’s an enchanted forest, a forgotten city, or a toymaker’s house, each place is given detail for you to imagine and explore. This is accomplished with the dreamy manner that the stories are told. The writing draws you in to these places, even if they promise danger.

Added to the stories are illustrations by Sara Kipin. They tell their own tale, brimming with both wonder and shock. After I read each story, I’d stop and stare at the illustrations, then flip through the pages quickly to watch all of them blend together. They make this collection a book lover’s dream.

The Language of Thorns is a treat for Leigh Bardugo’s fans or newcomers who want to sample her work. It’s a delicious collection for those who like their fairy tales with thorns (pun intended). I can’t recommend it enough.

Leah

About Leigh Bardugo

Leigh Bardugo is the #1 New York Times bestselling and USA Today bestselling author of Six of Crows (awarded starred reviews from Kirkus, Publishers Weekly, VOYA, SLJ, and the BCCB) and the Grisha Trilogy: Shadow and Bone, Siege and Storm, and Ruin and Rising. She was born in Jerusalem, grew up in Los Angeles, graduated from Yale University, and has worked in advertising, journalism, and most recently, makeup and special effects. These days, she lives and writes in Hollywood where she can occasionally be heard singing with her band.

Leah

Leah

Co-Blogger at Quite the Novel Idea
Leah has always been a bibliophile. An avid fantasy fan, she has spent many hours imagining magical worlds and wondering what it would be like to wield a sword. When she's not dreaming up her own standalone fantasy stories, she enjoys watching movies, traveling, and eating chocolate. She lives in California.
Leah

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2 responses to “{Leah Reviews} The Language of Thorns by Leigh Bardugo

  1. I loved this book so much! My personal favorite was The Witch of Duva. It was so creepy I had chills up my arms. And the last story made me bawl my eyes out. The writing is gorgeous and the illustrations were so perfect. I did the same with flipping through the pages, too lol

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